Health and Disability Actuarial Assets and Liabilities Other Than Liabilities for Incurred Claims

Revised Edition

TRANSMITTAL MEMORANDUM

March 2018

TO: Members of Actuarial Organizations Governed by the Standards of Practice of the Actuarial Standards Board and Other Persons Interested in Health and Disability Liabilities Other Than Liabilities for Incurred Claims

FROM: Actuarial Standards Board (ASB)

SUBJ: Actuarial Standard of Practice (ASOP) No. 42

This document contains the final version of a revision of ASOP No. 42, Health and Disability Actuarial Assets and Liabilities Other Than Liabilities for Incurred Claims.

History of the Standard

The ASB originally adopted ASOP No. 42, then titled Determining Health and Disability Liabilities Other Than Liabilities for Incurred Claims, in 2004 and updated the ASOP for deviation language in 2011.

This revision of ASOP No. 42 reflects a number of changes to other standards that have been made since its 2004 adoption, including updating the ASOP, where appropriate, to incorporate references to new standards that have since been issued, eliminate guidance that does not conform to current ASOP practices regarding references to other standards of practice, and make consistent the definitions used in the standard with those of other standards of practice. In addition, this revision of ASOP No. 42 reflects relevant legal, regulatory, and practice developments that have occurred since its initial adoption.

Exposure Draft

The exposure draft was released in May 2017 with a comment deadline of September 30, 2017. Five comment letters were received. For a summary of the issues contained in the comment letters on the exposure draft and the responses, please see appendix 2.

Notable Changes from the Exposure Draft

Notable changes include the following:

  1. added a definition and guidance on collectability; and
  2. added section 3.16, Reliance on Experts, to further support the guidance on collectability.

The ASB thanks everyone who took the time to contribute comments and suggestions on the exposure draft.

The ASB voted in March 2018 to adopt this standard.

Task Force to Revise ASOP No. 42
Matthew P. Chamblee, Chairperson
Richard A. Lassow, Vice Chairperson
Cheryl G. Allari Jinn-Feng Lin
Annette V. James Amy Pahl
Health Committee of the ASB
Donna C. Novak, Chairperson
Karen Bender Richard A. Lassow
Annette V. James Jinn-Feng Lin
Shannon C. Keller Timothy J. Wilder
Actuarial Standards Board
Beth E. Fitzgerald, Chairperson
Christopher S. Carlson Darrell D. Knapp
Maryellen J. Coggins Cande J. Olsen
Robert M. Damler Barbara L. Snyder
Mita D. Drazilov Kathleen A. Riley

The Actuarial Standards Board (ASB) sets standards for appropriate actuarial practice in the United States through the development and promulgation of Actuarial Standards of Practice (ASOPs). These ASOPs describe the procedures an actuary should follow when performing actuarial services and identify what the actuary should disclose when communicating the results of those services.

ACTUARIAL STANDARD OF PRACTICE NO. 42

HEALTH AND DISABILITY ACTUARIAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OTHER THAN LIABILITIES FOR INCURRED CLAIMS

STANDARD OF PRACTICE

 

Section 1. Purpose, Scope, Cross References, and Effective Date

1.1 Purpose

This actuarial standard of practice (ASOP) provides guidance to actuaries estimating or reviewing health benefit plan actuarial assets and liabilities, other than liabilities for incurred claims, when preparing or reviewing financial reports, claims studies, rates, or other actuarial communications as of a valuation date. This ASOP complements ASOP No. 5, Incurred Health and Disability Claims.

1.2 Scope

This standard applies to actuaries when performing actuarial services with respect to estimating or reviewing health benefit plan actuarial assets and liabilities, other than liabilities for incurred claims, on behalf of risk-bearing entities. This standard does not address interpretations of statutory or generally accepted accounting practices.

This standard does not apply to actuaries when estimating or reviewing assets or liabilities in accordance with other ASOPs, such as ASOP No. 4, Measuring Pension Obligations and Determining Pension Plan Costs or Contributions, and ASOP No. 6, Measuring Retiree Group Benefits Obligations and Determining Retiree Group Benefits Program Periodic Costs or Actuarially Determined Contributions. Furthermore, this standard does not apply in situations where a health or disability benefit is included within, and is incidental to, a plan subject to another practice-specific standard, such as a disability benefit under a life plan or a 401(h) account that is part of a pension plan.

This standard applies to the actuary only with respect to asset and liability estimates that are communicated as an actuarial finding (as described in ASOP No. 41, Actuarial Communications). Actions taken by the actuary’s principal regarding the use of such estimates are beyond the scope of this standard.

If the actuary departs from the guidance set forth in this standard in order to comply with applicable law (statutes, regulations, and other legally binding authority), or for any other reason the actuary deems appropriate, the actuary should refer to section 4.

1.3 Cross References

When this standard refers to the provisions of other documents, the reference includes the referenced documents as they may be amended or restated in the future, and any successor to them, by whatever name called. If any amended or restated document differs materially from the originally referenced document, the actuary should consider the guidance in this standard to the extent it is applicable and appropriate.

1.4 Effective Date

This standard will be effective for any actuarial work product with a valuation date on or after August 1, 2018.

Section 2. Definitions

The terms below are defined for use in this actuarial standard of practice.

2.1 Block of Business

All policies of a common coverage type (for example, major medical, preferred provider organization, or capitated managed care), demographic grouping (for example, size, age, or area), contract type, or other segmentation used in estimating assets and liabilities for actuarial purposes, or used by a risk-bearing entity for evaluating its business.

2.2 Capitation

The amount of money paid to a provider on a periodic basis to provide specific health care services under a health benefit plan regardless of the number or types of services actually rendered during the contractual period. The payments are usually quantified on a per covered member basis.

2.3 Carved-Out Services

Contractually designated services such as prescription drugs or dental, or condition-specific services such as cancer, mental health, or substance abuse treatment, excluded from a capitation, risk-sharing, or other contractual arrangement.

2.4 Collectability

The likelihood of receiving the amount of money owed.

2.5 Contract Period

The time period for which a contract is effective.

2.6 Contract Reserve

An amount established when a portion of the premium due prior to the valuation date is designed to pay all or a part of the claims expected to be incurred after the valuation date. A contract reserve may or may not include a provision for the unearned premium reserves. A contract reserve may also be referred to as an active life reserve or policy reserve.

2.7 Exposure Unit

A unit by which the cost for a health benefit plan is measured. For example, an exposure unit may be a contract, an individual covered, $100 of weekly salary, or $100 of monthly benefit.

2.8 Health Benefit Plan

A contract, such as an insurance policy, or other financial arrangement providing medical, prescription drug, dental, vision, disability income, long-term care, or other health-related benefits, whether on a reimbursement, indemnity, or service benefit basis, regardless of the form of the risk-bearing entity.

2.9 Long-Term Product

A health benefit plan that provides medical or disability benefits for an extended period of time. Some examples are cancer, long-term care, and long-term disability policies. The plan’s benefits may not become payable for several years after policy purchase and claims usually extend beyond the valuation date.

2.10 Premium Deficiency Reserve

A liability representing the deficiency, if any, in future revenues and current reserves less future claims and related expenses.

2.11 Providers

Individuals, groups, or organizations providing health care services or supplies, including but not limited to doctors, hospitals, independent physician associations, accountable care organizations, physical therapists, medical equipment suppliers, and pharmaceutical suppliers.

2.12 Provider-Related Asset or Liability

An amount established for expected future incentive payments or receipts or for non-claim related amounts such as risk-sharing arrangement and capitation payments or receipts.

2.13 Risk Adjustment Data Validation (RADV)

The process of verifying the accuracy of information submitted for use in a risk adjustment model.

2.14 Risk-Bearing Entity

The entity with respect to which the actuary is estimating liabilities or assets associated with health benefit plans or risk-sharing arrangements. Examples of risk bearing entities include but are not limited to managed-care entities, insurance companies, health care providers, self-funded employer plans, and government-sponsored plans or risk contracts.

2.15 Risk-Sharing Arrangement

An arrangement involving two or more entities, calling for payments contingent upon certain financial, operational, or other metrics. Examples include, but are not limited to, provider risk-sharing arrangements such as provider incentives, bonuses, and withholds or governmental risk-sharing arrangements such as risk corridor and risk-adjustment programs.

2.16 Time Value of Money

The principle that an amount of money available at an earlier point in time has different usefulness and value than the same amount of money has at a later point in time.

2.17 Trends

Measures of rates of change, over time, of the elements, such as cost, incidence, and severity, affecting the estimation of certain assets or liabilities.

2.18 Unearned Premium Reserve

An amount established to reflect premiums that have been collected prior to the valuation date for coverage after the valuation date.

2.19 Valuation Date

The date as of which the assets or liabilities are estimated.

Section 3. Analysis of Issues and Recommended Practices

3.1 Introduction

The estimation of actuarial assets and liabilities is fundamental to the practice of health actuaries. It is necessary for the completion of financial statements; for the analysis and projection of trends; for the analysis or development of rates; and for the development of various management reports, regardless of the type of risk-bearing entity.

3.2 Purpose or Use of the Asset or Liability Estimate

The actuary should identify the intended purpose or use of the estimate. Potential purposes or uses of estimates include, but are not limited to, estimates for external financial reporting, pricing, internal management reporting, appraisal work, and scenario analyses. Where multiple purposes or uses are intended, the actuary should consider the potential conflicts arising from those multiple purposes and uses and should consider making adjustments to accommodate the multiple purposes to the extent that, in the actuary’s professional judgment, it is appropriate and practical to make such adjustments.

3.3 Considerations for Estimating Assets and Liabilities

The actuary should include items associated with the estimation that, in the actuary’s professional judgment, are applicable, material, and are reasonably foreseeable to the actuary at the time of estimation.

In determining which items to include in the estimation of assets and liabilities, the actuary should consider items including but not necessarily limited to those described below and may rely on others as described in sections 3.14, 3.15, and 3.16.

3.3.1 Health Benefit Plan Provisions and Business Practices

The actuary should consider the health benefit plan provisions and related business practices, including special group contract holder requirements and provider arrangements, which in the actuary’s judgment may materially affect the cost, frequency, and severity of claims. These include, for example, elimination periods, deductibles, preexisting conditions limitations, maximum allowances, and managed-care restrictions.

The actuary should make a reasonable effort to understand any changes in plan provisions or business practices made since the last estimate of assets or liabilities. The actuary should consider how such differences or changes are likely to affect the estimation of assets or liabilities.

3.3.2 Risk-Sharing Arrangement Provisions

The actuary should consider the risk-sharing arrangement provisions that, in the actuary’s professional judgment, are likely to materially affect the financial results of the risk-sharing arrangement. Examples of such provisions include the following:

a. for risk-sharing arrangements including a provider organization, allowances for items such as number of enrolled lives included, the results of membership satisfaction surveys, and actual usage of certain facilities; and

b. for risk-sharing arrangements including a governmental organization, such as medical loss ratio rebates, required adjustments to premiums or claims.

When estimating an asset related to an amount receivable by the risk-bearing entity under such a risk-sharing arrangement, the actuary should reflect collectability.

3.3.3 Economic and Other External Influences

The actuary should consider economic and other external influences such as changes in price levels, unemployment levels, medical practice, managed care contracts, cost shifting, provider fee schedule changes, medical procedures, epidemics or catastrophic events, and adverse selection sometimes experienced in recessionary periods or prior to contract termination.

3.3.4 Risk Characteristics and Organizational Practices by Block of Business

The actuary should consider how marketing, underwriting, and other business practices can influence the types of risks accepted. Claims administration practices can influence claim rates and trends and in turn influence actuarial asset and liability estimates. Furthermore, the pattern of growth or contraction and relative maturity of a block of business can influence the magnitude of actuarial assets or liabilities.

 3.3.5 Legislative and Regulatory Requirements

The actuary should consider relevant legislative and regulatory requirements and changes as they pertain to the estimation of assets and liabilities. For example, governmental mandates can influence the provision of new benefits, risk characteristics, care management practices, rating, reserving and underwriting practices, methods used to estimate assets and liabilities, or claims processing practices.

3.3.6 Coordination of Benefits (COB), Subrogation, and Government Programs

The actuary should make a reasonable effort to understand the relevant organizational practices and regulatory requirements related to COB, subrogation, and government programs (state or federal). The actuary should consider how these items are reflected in the data (for example, negative claims or income) and make appropriate adjustments for COB, subrogation, and payments or recoveries resulting from government programs.

3.3.7 Carved-Out Services

The actuary should consider the pertinent benefits, payment arrangements, and separate reporting of those benefits subject to carved-out services in the estimation of assets and liabilities.

3.3.8 Time Value of Money

The actuary should consider if the time value of money will have a material effect in the estimation of assets and liabilities. The use of any interest discounts depends on the purpose for which assets and liabilities are being estimated and should reflect any applicable regulation or accounting standards.

3.3.9 Special Considerations for Long-Term Products

The actuary should consider the benefits available in long-term products, such as lump-sum, fixed, or variable payments for services; provisions such as cost of living adjustments and inflation protections; payment differences based on institutional or home-based care; social insurance integration; and the criteria for benefit eligibility.

3.3.10 Reinsurance Arrangements

The actuary should consider the effect of reinsurance arrangements in estimating assets and liabilities. In particular, the actuary should consider the effect of extended reporting or recovery periods, collectability, collection delay, any amounts already received, and any regulatory limitations associated with certain types of reinsurance. Reinsurance arrangements may also include risk-sharing provisions.

3.3.11 Non-Claim Expenses

The actuary should consider whether an explicit provision for non-claim expenses should be included, or whether a particular asset or liability implicitly provides for future non-claim expenses.

3.3.12 Consistency of Assumptions and Methodology

The actuary should use assumptions and methodology consistent with those used for estimating related assets, liabilities and reserves, such as incurred health benefit plan claims, unless it would be inappropriate to do so.

3.4 Considerations for Estimating Contract Reserves

The actuary should estimate a contract reserve when such a reserve is required by the rating approach. For example, contract reserves are typically estimated for entry-age-rated health benefit plans (where premium rates are based on entry age and may be level over the lifetime of the contract), or where flat premium rate guarantees or premium rate change limitations apply for multiple-year periods. The actuary may estimate the reserve using a seriatim basis, grouping techniques, or a combination of both. The actuary should use assumptions that are reasonable and consistent with the purpose for which the reserve is being calculated, and reasonable in the aggregate. Certain assumptions may vary over time or be subject to durational effects.

3.4.1 Interest Rates

The actuary should use interest rates to reflect the time value of money in the present value calculation and should consider items such as the projection period and market conditions.

3.4.2 Morbidity

The actuary should use morbidity assumptions that reflect the underlying risk. These assumptions may reflect factors such as age, gender, and marital status of the insured as well as the elimination period and dependent status. In addition, the actuary should take into account the impact of durational effects such as risk selection and pre-existing condition limitations, changes in health benefit plans, changes in provider agreements, adverse selection due to premium rate increases and plan design, and other factors that, in the actuary’s professional judgment, materially affect future claim payments.

3.4.3 Persistency

The actuary should consider using persistency or termination assumptions that include both involuntary terminations, such as deaths and disablements, and voluntary terminations, as appropriate. Voluntary termination assumptions, if any, should reflect the expected impact of future premium rate increases.

3.4.4 Non-Claim Expenses

The actuary should consider whether using an assumption is appropriate for expenses such as maintenance, acquisition, and claim settlement.

3.4.5 Trend

The actuary should consider using trend assumptions for inflation, utilization, morbidity, and expense rates.

3.4.6 Premium Rate Changes

When using an assumption to reflect premium rate changes in the reserve calculation, the actuary should use a premium rate change assumption that is reasonable in relation to the projected claims costs and the manner in which the rate change will be implemented (for example, on a given date for an entire block of business or on the next policy anniversary). This assumption should take into account factors such as market conditions, regulatory restrictions, and rate guarantees.

3.4.7 Previous Assumptions for Estimating Contract Reserves

The actuary may determine that assumptions used as of a prior valuation date are no longer appropriate and may change them in accordance with the standards of the financial statements in which the reserves are reported. If the actuary determines that a change in assumptions is warranted, the actuary should follow the process set forth in sections 3.4.1-3.4.6 when selecting new contract reserve assumptions for future valuation dates.

3.4.8 Valuation Method

For a new policy form, in addition to the assumptions discussed above, the actuary may need to determine the valuation method. Examples of valuation methods are the gross premium method, the net level premium method, and the full preliminary term (one- or two-year) method. Except where the valuation method is prescribed, the actuary should choose a method appropriate for the intended use of the reserve, such as in statutory financial statements or analysis of operating income. When not using a net level premium method, the actuary should consider the expense structure, such as higher first-year costs, in selecting the valuation method.

3.5 Considerations for Estimating Premium Deficiency Reserves

The actuary should estimate a premium deficiency reserve when such a reserve is required. Premium deficiency reserves are typically established for financial reporting purposes. They may also be established for other purposes such as management reporting. When estimating premium deficiency reserves, the actuary should use reasonable assumptions that are appropriate for the intended purpose, and also reasonable in the aggregate.

3.5.1. Blocks of Business

The actuary should consider blocks of business in a manner consistent with applicable financial reporting requirements. The characteristics of a block of business may include, but are not limited to, benefit type (for example, major medical, preferred provider organization, or capitated managed care), contract type (for example, group or individual policies), demographic grouping (for example, group size or geographical area), and length of rate guarantee period. A block of business should be large enough so that its financial results are material relative to the risk-bearing entity as a whole. The actuary may need to estimate a premium deficiency reserve for a block of business where a premium deficiency exists even if the contract period has not started.

3.5.2 Time Period

The actuary should use the valuation date as the beginning of the time period used to project losses from a block of business. In determining the end of the time period, the actuary should take into account items including, but not limited to, the end of the contract period, anticipated renewal of coverage, and the point at which the block no longer requires a premium deficiency reserve.

3.5.3 Exposure

The actuary should consider reasonable increases and decreases in exposure units over the time period of the calculation in the premium deficiency reserve calculation. This assumption should reflect changes due to factors including, but not limited to, morbidity, mortality, lapses, and the impact of expected premium rate changes.

3.5.4 Premium Rate Changes

When using a premium rate change assumption, the actuary should use an assumption that is reasonable in relation to the projected claims costs and the risk-bearing entity’s expectations. This assumption should consider factors such as market conditions, regulatory restrictions, and rate guarantees.

3.5.5 Claim Trend

The actuary should consider factors that may materially affect future claim payments, such as durational effects, changes in health benefit plans, changes in provider agreements, adverse selection due to premium rate increases, and plan design.

3.5.6 Risk-Sharing Arrangements

The actuary should consider risk-sharing arrangements between the risk-bearing entity and other entities, such as providers, governmental organizations, and employers. The actuary should reflect the collectability of any amounts under risk-sharing arrangements.

3.5.7 Interest Rates

When using an interest rate assumption to reflect the time value of money in a present value calculation, the actuary should consider items such as the projection period and market conditions.

3.5.8 Reinsurance

The actuary should consider the expected effects of reinsurance and changes in reinsurance premiums in estimating the premium deficiency reserve.

3.5.9 Taxes

The actuary should consider the effect of losses assumed in the calculation of the premium deficiency reserve on the risk-bearing entity’s taxes and may include a tax credit in the calculations where appropriate.

3.5.10 Non-Claim Expenses

The actuary should consider total expenses of the risk-bearing entity in estimating a premium deficiency reserve and should consider whether the expenses allocated to the block of business are reasonable for the purpose of estimating premium deficiency reserves. If only a portion of expenses are allocated to the otherwise deficient blocks of business, the actuary should verify that the remaining blocks of business cover the remaining expenses.

3.5.11 Applicable Authority

The actuary should consider any applicable law, regulation, or other binding authority when estimating premium deficiency reserves for financial reporting.

3.6 Reserve for Insufficient Administrative Fee for Self-Insured Contracts

A liability under a self-insured contract may need to be established if the administrative fees are insufficient to cover the direct fixed and variable expenses allocated to the self-insured contract. When estimating such a liability, the actuary should consider the expected income and expense flows under the contract using methods that are similar to those used in estimating a premium deficiency reserve for an insured health benefit plan and assumptions that are appropriate for self-insured contracts (see section 3.5 for further discussion).

3.7 Considerations When Estimating Provider-Related Assets and Liabilities

Provider-related liabilities may arise for a risk-bearing entity. Risk-sharing arrangements, such as incentive arrangements, penalty arrangements, and capitation arrangements can create potential assets or liabilities.

3.7.1 Provider Risk-Sharing and Capitation Arrangements

The actuary should consider the relevant contractual arrangements with providers to determine whether the contractual arrangements require an asset or liability to be estimated.

The actuary should consider whether a provider-related asset or liability for contracts in effect or not fully settled as of the valuation date should be estimated. In estimating the asset or liability, the actuary should consider any amounts due to or due from the provider, the overall financial condition of the provider (see section 3.7.2 for further discussion), whether losses can be offset with profits, risk transfer arrangements (such as stop loss or quota share provisions), the timing of receipts and payments, and collectability.

Similarly, the actuary should consider whether the risk of a provider failing or leaving a network creates a need to estimate a liability for the contingency of the payment by the risk-bearing entity of higher capitations or fees for services while a replacement provider is identified and suitable arrangements are concluded.

3.7.2 Provider Financial Condition

When a risk-bearing entity shares risk with a provider’s under a risk-sharing or capitation arrangement, the actuary should estimate, to the extent practical, whether the provider overall financial condition will allow it to meet its obligations, and, if not, adjust the asset or liability accordingly. To the extent that these assets or liabilities are not otherwise included in the claim liabilities of the risk-bearing entity, such assets or liabilities should be included in the provider-related liabilities.

3.7.3 Provider Incentive or Penalty Payments

If a provider agreement calls for incentive or penalty payments if certain conditions are met, such as quality of care standards or claim targets, the actuary should consider whether the risk-bearing entity should record a provider-related asset or liability.

3.7.4 Provider Risk-Bearing Entities

When the risk-bearing entity is a provider, the actuary should also consider relevant contractual arrangements with other providers as well as non- provider entities to determine whether the contractual arrangements require an asset or a liability to be estimated. One primary source of potential liability between providers is the receipt of capitation by one provider with payments due to other providers using fee-for-service.

3.8 Claim Adjustment Expense Liabilities

The actuary should estimate a liability for claim adjustment expenses associated with unpaid claims, unless such liabilities are included in the liability for unpaid claims, otherwise provided for appropriately, or not required by the relevant financial reporting guidance. The actuary may consider the company’s cost allocation approach in the liability estimation.

3.9 Risk Adjustment Settlements

A risk adjustment settlement may exist that will be either an asset or a liability to the risk-bearing entity. In addition to the relevant guidance in ASOP No. 45, The Use of Health Status Based Risk Adjustment Methodologies, the actuary should address the following components of the risk adjustment program, if applicable:

3.9.1 Market Neutrality

When the risk adjustment settlements are required to be revenue neutral across a market or other group of entities, the actuary should consider reasonably available aggregate market information, information specific to the risk-bearing entity, and collectability.

3.9.2 Risk Adjustment Payment Methodology

Risk adjustment payments typically follow a methodology that is governed by applicable law, regulation, or contractual arrangement. The actuary should review and understand the risk adjustment payment methodology used in estimating the settlement amounts.

3.9.3 Risk Adjustment Data Validation (RADV) Audit

The outcome of an RADV audit may be an amount that the insurer owes or is owed. When estimating the asset or liability that may be due from an RADV audit, the actuary should review relevant data validation reports.

3.10 Other Assets and Liabilities

The actuary may be requested to opine on the appropriateness of certain other assets or liabilities provided by another party. In some cases, the actuary may also estimate such assets and liabilities. When estimating or opining on such assets and liabilities, the actuary should refer to the appropriate section(s) below.

3.10.1 Liabilities for Payments to State Pools

The actuary should consider whether appropriate provision has been made for payments due under state assessment pools, such as insolvency pools, risk-sharing pools, or other arrangements.

3.10.2 Reserves for Unearned Premiums

The actuary should consider whether appropriate provision has been made for liabilities associated with the amount of premiums written and not yet earned.

3.10.3 Assets and Liabilities for Dividends, Experience Rating, and Premium Rebates

The actuary should consider the contract language or regulatory requirements defining the methodology prescribed for estimating the asset or liability, and refer to ASOP No. 5, if applicable.

3.10.4 Reserves for Extension of Benefits and Contingent Benefits Provisions

The actuary should consider whether the provisions of the health benefit plan require estimation of a reserve for extension of benefits or contingent benefits.

3.10.5 Prescription Drug Rebates

An asset may exist for an insurer receiving a rebate, or a liability may exist for a pharmaceutical firm or pharmacy benefits manager paying a rebate. The actuary should consider applicable rebate contracts or agreements. The actuary should consider any available historical drug usage, projected drug usage, and current emerging experience.

3.10.6 Cost Sharing Subsidies

Cost sharing subsidies may exist that pay for part or all of the cost sharing for eligible participants. Insurers may be paid on a budgeted basis with a final payment to or from the insurer based on the actual experience. The actuary should consider the following:

a. applicable law, regulation, or other binding authority;

b. the historical enrollment for members eligible for cost sharing subsidies;

c. any changes in the market that would impact the eligible enrollment;

d. any potential changes in the insurer’s relative market position that could impact the eligible enrollment; and

e. collectability.

3.11 Follow-Up Studies

The actuary may conduct follow-up studies that involve performing tests of reasonableness of the prior period asset or liability estimates and the methods used over time. When conducting such follow-up studies, the actuary should, to the extent practicable, do the following:

a. acquire the data to perform such studies;

b. perform studies in the aggregate or for pertinent blocks of business; and

c. utilize the results, if appropriate, in estimating assets and liabilities.

3.12 Provision for Adverse Deviation

Recognizing that assets and liabilities are an estimate of the value of true amounts that will emerge, the actuary should consider what explicit provision for adverse deviation, if any, might be appropriately included. If a provision for adverse deviation is included, the asset or liability should be appropriate, in the actuary’s professional judgement, for the intended use.

3.13 Evaluating Collectability

The actuary should use professional judgment when evaluating collectability and may consider the following:

a. materiality of the asset;

b. the expertise of other parties; and

c. other readily available information, such as financial statements.

3.14 Reliance on Data or Other Information Supplied by Others

When relying on data or other information supplied by others, the actuary should refer to ASOP No. 23, Data Quality, for guidance.

3.15 Reliance on Assumptions and Methods Selected by Others

When relying on assumptions and methods selected by others, the actuary should refer to ASOP No. 41 for guidance.

3.16 Reliance on Experts

An actuary may rely on experts in their field of knowledge when estimating or reviewing actuarial assets and liabilities. In determining the appropriate level of reliance, the actuary should consider whether the individual or individuals upon whom the actuary is relying are experts in the applicable field. The actuary should disclose the extent of any such reliance.

3.17 Documentation

The actuary should document the methods, assumptions, procedures, and the sources of the data used. The documentation should be in a form such that another actuary qualified in the same practice area could assess the reasonableness of the work.

Section 4. Communications and Disclosures

4.1 Actuarial Communication

When issuing an actuarial communication subject to this standard, the actuary should refer to ASOP Nos. 23 and 41. In addition, such actuarial communications should disclose the following, as applicable:

a. important dates used in the analysis;

b. significant limitations, if any, which constrained the actuary’s asset or liability estimate analysis such that, in the actuary’s professional judgment, there is a significant risk that a more in-depth analysis would produce a materially different result;

c. specific significant risks and uncertainties, if any, with respect to whether actual results may vary from the asset or liability estimate;

d. the risk that provider insolvency may have a material effect on the risk-bearing entity’s ultimate asset or liability, as described in section 3.7.2;

e. any follow-up studies the actuary may have used in the development of the estimate of assets or liabilities, as described in section 3.11;

f. any explicit provision for adverse deviation, as described in section 3.12;

g. when updating a previous estimate, changes in assumptions, procedures, methods, or models that the actuary believes to have a material impact on the health benefit plan actuarial asset or liability estimate, as well as the reasons for such changes to the extent known by the actuary. The actuary may need to disclose these changes in cases other than when updating a previous estimate, consistent with the purpose or use of the health benefit plan actuarial asset or liability estimate. This standard does not require the actuary to measure or quantify the impact of such changes; and

h. any reliance on experts, as described in section 3.16.

4.2 Additional Disclosures

The actuary should also include the following, as applicable, in an actuarial communication:

a. the disclosure in ASOP No. 41, section 4.2, if any material assumption or method was prescribed by applicable law (statutes, regulations, and other legally binding authority);

b. the disclosure in ASOP No. 41, section 4.3, if the actuary states reliance on other sources and thereby disclaims responsibility for any material assumption or method selected by a party other than the actuary; and

c. the disclosure in ASOP No. 41, section 4.4, if, in the actuary’s professional judgment, the actuary has otherwise deviated materially from the guidance of this ASOP.

Appendix 1

Background and Current Practices

Note: This appendix is provided for informational purposes, but is not part of the standard of practice.

Background

Health benefit plan actuarial assets and liabilities other than incurred claims are important to many health lines of business. New forms of these assets and liabilities arose in recent years with the rapid increase in managed care provider risk arrangements and healthcare reform. The attention to financial statements enhanced the importance of these assets and liabilities.

Current Practices

Actuaries are able to obtain information relating to actuarial assets and liabilities for health benefit plan coverages from various publications from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, including the following:

  • the Accounting Practices and Procedures Manual;
  • the Health Insurance Reserves Model Regulation; and
  • the Health Reserves Guidance Manual.

Similar information on when assets and liabilities are required by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles is available in the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Statements of Financial Accounting Standards.

Estimating assets and liabilities may be necessary or useful in situations other than financial statement reporting, such as the acquisition of a block of a business or in experience analysis.

Appendix 2

Comments on the Exposure Draft and Responses

The exposure draft of this revision of ASOP No. 42, Health and Disability Actuarial Assets and Liabilities Other Than Liabilities for Incurred Claims, was issued in May 2017 with a comment deadline of September 30, 2017. Five comment letters were received, some of which were submitted on behalf of multiple commentators, such as by firms or committees. For purposes of this appendix, the term “commentator” may refer to more than one person associated with a particular comment letter. The Task Force carefully considered all comments received, and the Health Committee and ASB reviewed (and modified, where appropriate) the proposed changes.

Summarized below are the significant issues and questions contained in the comment letters and the responses to each.

The term “reviewers” includes the Task Force, Health Committee, and the ASB. Unless otherwise noted, the section numbers and titles used below refer to those in the exposure draft.

Click here to see comments and responses.

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